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Podcast

Podcast Episode 2: What Puts The “Creative” into Creative Life Story Work?

In our second episode, our host Dawn Williams finds out from artists working on Blue Cabin’s Creative Life Story Work programme how they approach the work.

Transcript

Please note that this transcript is auto-generated and therefore will contain some errors and natural pauses in conversation.

00:00:07:17 – 00:00:21:22

Dawn

Welcome to Blue Cabin’s Creative Life Story Work podcast, where we explore how a creative approach to life story work can help children and young people who have been in care make sense of their past and build a brighter future.

 

00:00:23:12 – 00:00:45:05

Dawn

My name is Dawn Williams. I’m director of Blue Carbon, who is the organization leading creative life story work. If you heard our first podcast, you will have heard about the beginnings, the stories you will have heard from the main players Richard Rose, Toni Joyce, Jennie Young and some of our associate artists.

 

00:00:45:18 – 00:01:12:07

Dawn

If you missed that podcast, how could you miss it? You couldn’t find it again on our website at WW W Dot, we are blue carbon dot com forward slash c al ACW podcast for today’s podcast. I’m absolutely delighted to have back with us in the studio, Jenny Young and also two of our associate artists who are facilitating

 

00:01:12:13 – 00:01:21:08

Dawn

creative activities for care, experienced children and young people in the Northeast. Alena Miller from Star Bright Arts. Good morning, Alina.

 

00:01:21:10 – 00:01:22:03

Elena

Good morning.

 

00:01:22:08 – 00:01:24:12

Dawn

And Nick Golightly. Good morning.

 

00:01:24:12 – 00:01:24:21

Nicola

Nick.

 

00:01:24:21 – 00:01:47:13

Dawn

Good morning and welcome to Jennie Young, director of Blue Carbon Morning. You’re very welcome this morning into the studio, and I’d really like us this morning to tell the story of what it’s like to be an artist delivering some of the creative life story work activities for children and young people.

 

00:01:47:19 – 00:01:58:11

Dawn

But before we do that, I wonder if Jenny, you would like to give us a quick overview of creative life story work and on the work the Blue Cup has been doing.

 

00:01:58:18 – 00:02:21:11

Jenny

Yes, and that will be a pleasure. So in terms of creative lifestyle, we work. The model was devised as part of a program that began in 2018 as a result of some Department for Education funding that was accessed by South Tyneside Council and their partners in practice work.

 

00:02:21:19 – 00:02:34:07

Jenny

And a key person involved in this entire story is someone called Tony Joyce featured as part of our last podcast, and he approached blue cupping at the time and said we would love to do some work with you.

 

00:02:34:08 – 00:02:50:21

Jenny

There’s some really important needs that need to be addressed in South Tyneside Council, and one of those was around their life story work. And so back in 2018, the conversations began with South Tyneside Council about their life story, work approach.

 

00:02:50:22 – 00:03:05:19

Jenny

And at that time, we also had a hunch that because all of our work is focused on care, experienced children and young people, we wondered as a company whether there was a role for us to play in supporting local authorities to re-imagine life story work.

 

00:03:06:07 – 00:03:19:18

Jenny

Now, all of our activities are artists led by wonderful people like a learner and nick. And so our hunch was around, is there a role and that an artist could play in supporting life story work in any way?

 

00:03:20:10 – 00:03:37:22

Jenny

And so back in 2018, we had those conversations initially with South Tyneside Council, but at that time, we we certainly weren’t an expert in life story work at all. We were very interested, but we needed somebody who really understood it and was an expert so we could work alongside them.

 

00:03:37:23 – 00:04:02:14

Jenny

And we managed to find the amazing Richard Rose and his therapeutic life story work model has been developed, and he delivers it all over the all over the world, and it’s called the therapeutic life story work approach. So the bringing together really of South Tyneside Council, Blue Cup and Richard was the start of the conversation around reimagining

 

00:04:02:22 – 00:04:19:20

Jenny

a therapeutic life story work model. And then we felt it really important to reach out to artists that we already worked with, but also artists that we were known to us and who who came with a really, really fantastic reputation in terms of their work.

 

00:04:19:20 – 00:04:33:14

Jenny

And we started a conversation at that time with five associate artists. So there’s a learner, Nick Puddy, who was in our last podcast, Michelle Ward and also Curious Monkey, about whether they’d like to be involved in this fantastic journey with us.

 

00:04:34:01 – 00:04:54:05

Dawn

Thank you, Jenny. So let’s hear from our associate artists who are with us this morning. So Eleanor and Nick may be the line up first. Before you start talking about creative life story work, would you like to give us a bit of a pen portrait of what what the work is that you do?

 

00:04:54:14 – 00:05:04:10

Dawn

What’s what, what? What would a usual day if there is one? As a liner from Star Bright Arts, what would a usual day look sound of fear like?

 

00:05:04:21 – 00:05:26:01

Elena

Oh, so yes. All one day is the same in my little world here, but I have lots of many different hats. And so alongside Stauber, I ought to just create a facilitation of various types of art forms. I’m also a clown doctor working on the children’s wards, and I also work for seven stories the National Center for

 

00:05:26:01 – 00:05:48:20

Elena

Children’s Books, Facility and Story Events, and create, write and send sensory story development as well. But yeah, I’ve I’ve had a go at everything and anything in terms of art, and I love learning new skills. And yeah, it’s been such an amazing journey to kind of try and squeeze everything into the all about me sessions like pull

 

00:05:48:20 – 00:05:58:07

Elena

and draw in lots of different elements in the sessions has been really wonderful. But yeah, no, no one day is the same. But that makes life very exciting for me.

 

00:05:58:13 – 00:06:07:10

Dawn

Wow. Thank you, Alina. And Nick, the same question. Tell us a bit about Nick Golightly, the artist.

 

00:06:07:15 – 00:06:31:14

Nicola

And so I am a graphic designer and visual artist. I have quite a strong thread of participatory work through my practice and I have done since I started as a visual artist many moons ago. And it’s very much about sort of bringing my practice as a graphic designer to sort of the setting with participants and using that

 

00:06:31:14 – 00:06:46:13

Nicola

as a sort of overarching tool to bring pleasure and fun and different outcomes. And the people that I work with can make and collaboration is at the core of my practice. I’m not very good at working on my own.

 

00:06:46:23 – 00:06:54:02

Nicola

I have so within this set of working with people is really quite cool to the way that that I produce work.

 

00:06:54:05 – 00:07:14:12

Dawn

That’s lovely. Thank you, both of you. And we’re going to hear from Toni Joyce from South Tyneside Council, a who’s who who described the difference between therapy, between life story work and the creative life story work that you’ve been involved in.

 

00:07:14:12 – 00:07:18:06

Dawn

So if we hear from him first and then I’m going to ask you some questions about that as well.

 

00:07:18:20 – 00:07:38:09

Tony

I think the main difference between life story work and creative life story work is nothing more than than in its approach. Life story work can sometimes be seen as something that is a is a is a theme or it’s a task, or it is a specific piece of work.

 

00:07:38:22 – 00:07:57:13

Tony

What creative life story work does? It brings in the notion of play. It brings in the notion of a fusion of arts and crafts, and it just makes it more fun and therefore makes it more enjoyable for for children, young people.

 

00:07:57:13 – 00:08:09:04

Tony

It can be done at their pace. It’s it brings out this kind of talents and interests that reassess their self-esteem and in the art of seriousness, their confidence within.

 

00:08:09:17 – 00:08:33:03

Dawn

So Tony’s explanation of a creative life story work. So Alena, can you cast your mind back to 2008 when you were first beginning to devise those sessions? Where did you start? How did you begin to start framing those sessions that you’d be delivering to children?

 

00:08:33:09 – 00:08:52:21

Elena

Yeah. So like Tony said, I think play was the most important thing. I think within all of the things that I deliver, like Nick in terms of the participation elements, there’s so much play involved. And I think for adults, it can be quite hard for them to get back to that playful zone.

 

00:08:53:14 – 00:09:12:08

Elena

Obviously, children, it’s quite a natural thing, but you want to take the camera on that journeys to be able to support the young person as well. And so it was and I started off with the kind of ideas of boxes and opening boxes and exploring boxes together, and that eventually they would collectively make a box with lots

 

00:09:12:08 – 00:09:29:20

Elena

of special things, which became that I treasure box. But yet I was so excited to deliver the first session, which was a game of opening boxes and that didn’t know what was inside and they got to explore them with with that with the camera and yes, just the faces of just the pure joy and excitement.

 

00:09:30:02 – 00:09:45:01

Elena

And that was like a really brilliant moment for me to kind of watch how the child and Keira interacted as well. And just so that it meant that you could tailor the sessions a little bit as well to the needs of the children and the carers.

 

00:09:45:08 – 00:10:03:08

Elena

And so, yeah, being playful is as being a massive, massive part. And yeah, there’s been such an amazing journey. And like every time I’ve delivered, the sessions have changed a little bit, but it is about meeting the children and carers and and and making it fit for them.

 

00:10:03:15 – 00:10:12:12

Dawn

And Nick, can you give us a flavor of some of the all about me sessions that you’ve been delivering to children and their carers?

 

00:10:13:08 – 00:10:32:18

Nicola

So the sessions that we’ve run have all been linked to sex itself, key themes and linked to the young people in their life story and around those things and sort of talking about emotions and feelings and who they are, who they live with, what their identity is.

 

00:10:33:02 – 00:10:58:20

Nicola

And so around those ideas, I began making and designing of books and different activities such as doodle jams, which kind of enticed information out seeing people without them, necessarily knowing that they were doing their life story work. But it was about them relax and enjoy in different activities, which were very much about Mark making, about visualizing different

 

00:10:58:20 – 00:11:16:23

Nicola

things, about making maps that were enjoyable activities. I mean, in some of the sessions, we threw paper airplanes into a bin and talked about things whilst doing that. So it’s sort of activities that kind of relax and are quite therapeutic in themselves, regardless of the sort of subject area that we’re talking about.

 

00:11:16:23 – 00:11:31:08

Nicola

Almost, but actually end like that myself, just open up the opportunity to have fun and engage with others in the room who are in similar situations, be with the person who cares for you. And also being with professionals in the room.

 

00:11:31:08 – 00:11:42:11

Nicola

So it’s a safe environment, but also that you’re you’re, you know, it’s a talking point. It’s an activity to engage with together. I think as a parent, you sort of realize that you don’t always have that time to do that.

 

00:11:42:12 – 00:12:00:23

Nicola

As a parent, myself with our children, especially through lockdown, having that focus time, that’s quite relaxed and positive. And there isn’t, you know, it’s not schoolwork, it’s not, you know, you must complete this outcome, but there’s something there’s a there’s a structure around it and it’s something to do and engage with.

 

00:12:01:04 – 00:12:21:23

Nicola

But actually, the outcome is almost secondary but still crucial to what we’re doing. So, you know, to make a concertina folded book, which is a timeline which starts with when you were born and ends with today. But the plots that in a creative way and through doodling and using different sort of techniques, actually, you end up with

 

00:12:21:23 – 00:12:33:20

Nicola

something that’s beautiful at the end of it, which is a memory of that moment. But actually the process of being involved in that space. The people you surround it with is as much kind of the the important gem that happens, I suppose.

 

00:12:34:06 – 00:12:59:21

Dawn

So a very space safe space for some rich conversations happening whilst making making an object. And both Nick and Alina mentioned other adults in the room. Jenny, I wondered if you wanted to say something about the roles of the pastoral support worker who’s also in the space with the artists when the sessions are taking place?

 

00:12:59:23 – 00:13:16:13

Jenny

Yeah, we in the in the devising of all re-imagining of Richard’s therapeutic life story work model, just briefly to describe Richard’s model. There is, and it’s a triangle. If imagine a triangle and at the base of the triangle is all about me.

 

00:13:16:20 – 00:13:36:09

Jenny

And in Richard’s original model, all about me was direct work. So working through the six themes that our associate artists still work through. But with Richard’s model, that was on a one to one basis, for example, between a foster carer and a child or a social worker and a child, and that takes place over about a six

 

00:13:36:09 – 00:13:52:04

Jenny

week period. And so that’s at the base of the triangle. And then the next tier is more about me. And that’s for children who are a little bit more perhaps stuck in terms of the now and want to explore that a little bit more in a more in-depth way.

 

00:13:52:14 – 00:14:12:19

Jenny

That’s facilitated specifically by a therapeutic life story worker with the child and a carer in a home environment. And that takes a longer time than all about me because of the content of those sessions is more in-depth. And then at the top of the triangle is therapeutic life story work, and that’s in nine to twelve months process

 

00:14:12:19 – 00:14:34:04

Jenny

facilitated again by therapeutic life story. Work with a foster carer in the child and is for those children and young people who’ve perhaps faced quite significant trauma or abuse that have a lot of questions about why they are where they are at, who was in their life, and a lot of that past trauma and abuse perhaps is

 

00:14:34:04 – 00:14:52:13

Jenny

also impacting upon the now for them. So that’s why that that top tier takes a lot longer. And in reimagining all about me at the best of therapeutic life story work, we wondered if actually could this be done in a group setting a very small group setting nevertheless, but a group setting whereby you’re bringing together a small

 

00:14:52:13 – 00:15:14:11

Jenny

group of similar age children to have the conversations with their trusted adult in a group setting. And so the trusted adult, in a lot of instances is a foster carer because what we’re wanting to support with creative experiences for all about me is the opportunity for that child and the adult to explore those themes in the session

 

00:15:14:11 – 00:15:33:15

Jenny

in a really safe way to be on equal footing with regards to the conversation, but also to enable the beginnings of that conversation in the room so that that conversation can happen between sessions, can happen over the dinner table, can happen in a car journey because what we wanted to make sure with this model is that the

 

00:15:33:15 – 00:15:52:05

Jenny

conversation is never off the table and that the trusted adult feels supported and am confident to facilitate those conversations in any space. So it was really key for us that in the development of a group setting creative experience for all about me, that the key trusted adult was alongside the child.

 

00:15:52:20 – 00:16:11:12

Jenny

So in a room, you have six children and their six trusted adults working together. The artist is one of the facilitators and then alongside the artists we identified with Richard and also with South Tyneside Council and the artists, a real important role that we call a pastoral support worker or a therapeutic social worker.

 

00:16:12:03 – 00:16:36:12

Jenny

And what’s important about that role is they lead on the safeguarding of the space. They lead on observing the sessions in terms of what other pastoral needs of the children and the adults, and also work alongside the artists to be a core facilitator, second pair of eyes to notice things that are taking place, notice conversations and get

 

00:16:36:12 – 00:16:55:11

Jenny

alongside a child and a foster carer, for example, if something is a bit tricky. And also take part in the creative activity as well and be on an equal footing alongside everybody in the space because seeing everybody play and seeing everybody be creative is actually a very, very simple and grounding of our sessions.

 

00:16:55:22 – 00:17:19:02

Jenny

So you usually have up to six adults, six children and then the artist and pastoral support worker working really closely together. And I think that role alongside the artists is so crucial to to how successful the initial work was in South Tyneside, because it’s it’s it’s recognizing the and the importance of somebody being in that space to

 

00:17:19:02 – 00:17:33:09

Jenny

think of things from that pastoral point of view. If a child, for example, needs a bit of a break, the artist isn’t necessarily having to go with that child when they leave the space. Actually, the pastoral support worker can do that and check in with the child if they need to just have a bit of time out

 

00:17:33:09 – 00:17:46:23

Jenny

, and it means that there’s somebody always in that space leading on the activity as well. So the configuration of who is in the room is being given a lot of thought and it’s still emerging and it’s still something that we, we think can talk about regularly.

 

00:17:47:00 – 00:17:51:07

Jenny

But yeah, that’s that’s how it looks and that’s how the model works at the moment.

 

00:17:51:16 – 00:18:11:04

Dawn

So a huge amount of thought and care going into the activities that those children and young people and the adults in their lives are taking part in. And as associate artists Nick and Alina, what support have you been given as artists?

 

00:18:11:05 – 00:18:25:00

Dawn

Because I’m imagining there’ll be some quite difficult conversations that you’re hearing in those rooms as well. And so from an artist perspective, what needs to be in place to support you to do this really quite tricky and challenging work?

 

00:18:25:05 – 00:18:46:03

Elena

I think what was brilliant on the first few rounds of the sessions that we did was that we supported each other and we kind of shared our thoughts and feelings and and kind of wrote those down and we were able to look at each of those kind of notes after reflections and things, which was really useful to

 

00:18:46:03 – 00:19:07:18

Elena

kind of inform our own practice. But what’s really great about this next and lot of sessions that we’re going in is that we’re going to be having supervision. So Matt, who is a trained B t therapist, I think I might say and is going to be delivered soon, but like groups of supervision.

 

00:19:07:18 – 00:19:27:12

Elena

So if, for example, it’s me and Michelle, he will be doing sessions together and kind of looking at goals and things because there are there are challenging conversations and sometimes you might find out some information about a young person that is really, really quite difficult to process because it’s nothing that you’ve ever experienced before.

 

00:19:27:22 – 00:19:43:03

Elena

And so how can we best support the children if they are, you know, and coming out with with with these things? And so I think having having this support network there from from a trained therapist for us is a really, really brilliant thing.

 

00:19:43:03 – 00:19:49:18

Elena

And I hope that and that that might go on in the future as well. I don’t know if Nick’s got anything more to say.

 

00:19:50:06 – 00:20:12:10

Nicola

Yes, I’d certainly say that the support of our sort of fellow artists is like the Mirror. What Alan has said is being crucial, really, because we’re all going through exactly the same experience. But the training that’s been provided from Blue Cabin with regards of social pedagogy and we we sat alongside foster carers and social workers in the

 

00:20:12:10 – 00:20:29:20

Nicola

training that Richard Rose led in South Tyneside. We we kind of, you know, we all have different experiences and understanding of the children who we will be working with, but also the adults that surround them and the professionals that kind of create a map around those young people and support them.

 

00:20:30:04 – 00:20:43:13

Nicola

So I think what it’s enabled thinking back to 2002 and 18 thinking to now, I think what in my mind, it’s enabled me to understand not just the young person that we’re working with, but also how they sit within.

 

00:20:43:21 – 00:20:59:17

Nicola

You know that their care and support and who enables them to be there in the room, but also who they go to to talk to. And also and I think that gives us a good understanding of who we’re working with and what, what, what system is in place to support those young people.

 

00:21:00:04 – 00:21:16:08

Nicola

And I also think emotionally and personally, those reflection sessions and certainly the supervision that’s going to be starting. We’ve had one sessions so far. I think that’s crucial in order to for us to process the information that we are the young people we’re working with.

 

00:21:16:15 – 00:21:33:06

Nicola

I mean, quite naturally with, you know, 15 years experience as an artist, regardless of who I work with, there is always that time afterwards of reflection and after a session because it’s a it’s a pressurized, you know, there is something that you are trying to achieve within that session.

 

00:21:33:10 – 00:21:46:23

Nicola

You don’t always know who you’re going to be working with. We work with these young children and young people for six weeks. We start to understand who they are and what makes them tick. But also, we’re understanding about their journey to to to get into that point.

 

00:21:46:23 – 00:22:09:11

Nicola

And I think sometimes what they might tell us or what we might sort of hold is quite a big thing. And so I suppose that support the blue cabins enabled around us as well is is crucial so that we don’t feel that that stress or pressure or holding has any any effect that it shouldn’t, I suppose.

 

00:22:09:21 – 00:22:27:02

Dawn

Thank you. So a really clear and detailed map of the support and training that you as artists have been immersed in in order to be able to deliver this work in a really safe way for both the children there are.

 

00:22:27:10 – 00:22:50:14

Dawn

And yourselves as well. And I wondered Alina and Nic if you had anything to say about how this work transfers or does it translate into other pieces of work that you’re doing as freelance artists? What’s the what’s the impact been on on pieces of work that you’re doing out with blue carbon?

 

00:22:51:15 – 00:23:08:21

Elena

I think the biggest learning process for me has been the kind of transference of moving stuff online. So the fact that the sessions are going to be being delivered online, we’ve done lots of well that training alongside the kind of support and stuff and to look at how you can deliver online.

 

00:23:08:21 – 00:23:30:16

Elena

And so there’s been lots of sessions with each of their sessions, with other amazing facilitators who have shared their knowledge and skills with with delivering online and using lots of different styles and techniques. So that’s been a really big learning curve and has filtered out into lots of my other realms of work.

 

00:23:31:03 – 00:23:33:03

Dawn

Yeah, thank you, Nick.

 

00:23:33:19 – 00:23:55:21

Nicola

I think for me, it’s about sort of consolidating a lot of kind of my working practices that I’ve used over the years. And I think that focus time on on one project, which has taken off a couple of years so far and has longevity and means that I think it’s made me think about the way in which

 

00:23:55:21 – 00:24:11:14

Nicola

I use design as a tool for creative thinking and the way in which I utilize play and not every moment in every session needs to be making. Not every moment in every session needs to be focused on the task.

 

00:24:12:02 – 00:24:30:14

Nicola

I think I’ve certainly learned from my peers in terms of the and Paddy and Michelle, our conversations around how we engage young people and how we understand what’s happening in a room. I think as a as an artist with this practice and my fellow artists, it’s really interesting to sit and talk about how we approach things and

 

00:24:30:14 – 00:24:51:22

Nicola

how we plan things. And also, you do that at that moment also is that how you evaluate? And it’s not necessarily at all that our creative practices, in fact, that sort of secondary, but that approach as a participatory artist and how how we have a sort of a respect for each other’s skill sets and how we approach

 

00:24:51:22 – 00:25:08:06

Nicola

working with young people. I think that’s been really I think that’s grounded me along with learned about social pedagogy and that approach to sort of work. I think it’s really sort of started me in my career. I know that sounds massive and I’m not on one, don’t worry.

 

00:25:08:06 – 00:25:23:16

Nicola

But like in terms of approach, I think that’s been really important. But I also want to say that sort of personally, I think it’s been really important the adoptive parent talking about life story work, thinking about young people who were on a journey, thinking about life.

 

00:25:23:16 – 00:25:38:04

Nicola

I mean, it’s massive. But also, I think it’s really important to reflect upon all the things that we do in. And and yeah, I think it’s been a real sort of a journey, but it’s been a really sort of it’s been gold, do you know what I mean?

 

00:25:38:04 – 00:25:52:21

Nicola

Like, I’m coming out with all the collie phrases now. So it’s been like, it’s me. It’s been a real learning experience as a professional, and I don’t think I necessarily expected that at the beginning when Jenny came to came to me and said, What do you think about this basically?

 

00:25:52:21 – 00:25:58:00

Nicola

So I think that’s that’s really good to consider. I think as a professional artist.

 

00:25:58:02 – 00:26:18:11

Dawn

Creative life story, what will be continuing until 2022? So in my closing question to you, I’d like you to imagine that we are in 2022 and creative life story work has been the best it could possibly be. Think about what are people saying about it?

 

00:26:18:11 – 00:26:32:15

Dawn

What are the conversations that you’re hearing? And if you were to write a postcard back to yourself now, what would you write on that postcard? Jenny from Blue Cabin’s point of view? What would you write on that postcard from 2022?

 

00:26:33:13 – 00:26:57:14

Jenny

Oh, goodness me, and that’s a really tough, tough question at the center of all of this, I think, has always been. Providing a space for care, experienced children and young people to have. Suppose more agency. Over. Their life stories.

 

00:26:58:04 – 00:27:34:15

Jenny

And so I would hope that. My postcard says something like children and young people. Oh. And two children and young people are. Demanding this model from their local authorities, our children and young people tell those that this is making and just making a difference to them and and is enabling them to feel that they are.

 

00:27:35:17 – 00:28:02:00

Jenny

More aware of their life, stories have more opportunities to have those conversations have have language to to use whereby they can describe how they feel about those things, but also feel really able and empowered to ask questions if they don’t know the answer to something and they’re in turn their carers, they’re social workers also feel confident enough

 

00:28:02:00 – 00:28:18:11

Jenny

to sit alongside them and help them work through that and help them answer some of those those questions that they might have. So I would I would hope that the postcard Scott says that children and young people want more of this and that that’s something we can we can help help with.

 

00:28:18:19 – 00:28:20:19

Dawn

Eleanor, what would your postcard say?

 

00:28:21:05 – 00:28:46:10

Elena

Something. Probably quite similar at the Jenny’s just that that that the young people and that they’re important people in their lives have built those connections. Those building blocks are stronger and that they are able to share their thoughts and feelings and emotions around what has happened to them in their lives, and that they’re that they want more

 

00:28:46:10 – 00:28:52:01

Elena

and that it’s it’s really helped them and that it’s it’s worked and there should be more.

 

00:28:52:19 – 00:28:53:14

Dawn

Thank you.

 

00:28:53:16 – 00:29:02:04

Nicola

And Nick, I’m not going to end with some kind of corny phrase. I’m trying, Alison. It’s a Jenny and Elinor thing, you know, don’t do it, Nicola. Don’t do it.

 

00:29:02:15 – 00:29:04:05

Dawn

That’s why I she to nick.

 

00:29:04:17 – 00:29:22:04

Nicola

All the disco classics are just running through my head. Well, I can say I’m not entirely sure that I can encapsulate what I would would put on a postcard, but I think there’s something about that kind of we’re all human, after all, aren’t we?

 

00:29:22:09 – 00:29:40:02

Nicola

And I think something quite honest that needs to be remembered that these are young people who have a life story and we all have a life story regardless what it looks like or how it works. And I think the positive of this is that we’re telling those life stories and that’s what’s got to be held close to

 

00:29:40:02 – 00:29:53:10

Nicola

our hearts, really, that whatever we do that it’s really good work and it’s important. And so, you know, the stresses and strains of us as artists putting together sessions and then talking to myself now this is my mantra.

 

00:29:53:21 – 00:30:06:15

Nicola

But, you know, getting worried about online sessions, getting worried that we’ll lose our internet connection, getting precious about what we look like on screen. Actually, what’s really important is that focus, isn’t it? And those young people, we are human, after all.

 

00:30:08:10 – 00:30:26:16

Dawn

I’d like to say a huge thank you to Alina, Nick and Jenny for being in Blue Cap and second Creative Life Story Work podcast this morning. Thank you for your insights and comments on the really important work that you are all involved in.

 

00:30:27:20 – 00:30:40:06

Dawn

Whether you’re a foster carer, someone who has experience of the care system or you work with children and young people, we hope this episode has given you an insight into how we could make life story work better for young people.

 

00:30:40:23 – 00:30:58:23

Dawn

Would really love to hear your thoughts. You can tweet us on at We Are Blue Cabin or if you’re one of the 15 hundred people taking part in our Creative Life Story Work Learning program, you can always get in touch through the online learning platform if you’d like to listen to future episodes.

 

00:30:59:02 – 00:31:13:17

Dawn

Remember to subscribe wherever is you usually get your podcasts or you can listen on our website at W W W Dot. We are Blue Cap Income Forward Slash C LSW podcast.

 

00:31:15:14 – 00:31:23:00

Will

The Creative Life Story Work podcast is produced for Blue Cabin by Enya Media. Find out more at ONIY Dot Media.

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We are keen to hear from you: the listener! Whether you work in children’s services, the creative sector, are a foster carer or adoptive parent, someone who has been in care, or you are an artist keen to learn more about this work, we’d like to hear your views on the topics we discuss in the show.

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Before you do so, please read the following!

  • Your message can be a maximum of 90 seconds long

  • By recording a message, you are giving us permission to play the recording on the Creative Life Story Work Podcast, which is available for anyone to listen to, from anywhere in the world.

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Produced and mixed by Will Sadler of Anya Media. You can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts by clicking one of the following links: