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Podcast

Podcast Episode 5: More About Me

Dawn Williams is joined by Professor Richard Rose of Life Story Work International and experienced Therapeutic Life Story Worker: Lynda Gallagher to discuss the “More About Me” stage of the Creative Life Story Work process.

Transcript

Please note that this transcript is auto-generated and therefore will contain some errors and natural pauses in conversation.

00:00:06:16 – 00:00:20:15

Dawn

Welcome to the Creative Life Story Work podcast, where we explore how a creative approach to life story work can help children and young people who have been in care make sense of their past and build a brighter future.

 

00:00:21:22 – 00:00:36:05

Dawn

A new model for life story work is being rolled out in the north east of England, and this podcast shows the latest learning and investigates how it could help improve the lives of care, experienced children and young people across the country.

 

00:00:37:08 – 00:00:53:22

Dawn

My name is Dawn Williams and I am an associate of Blue Cup and one of the partners on the exciting work. Today we are asking the question How can we best support children and young people on the more about the pathway in creative life story work?

 

00:00:54:19 – 00:01:13:09

Dawn

Discussing it with me today, Lynda Gallacher, a very experienced therapeutic life story worker and Professor Richard Rose from Therapeutic Life Story Work International. Definitely the right experts to have in the room. Welcome, Linda. Lovely to see you this morning.

 

00:01:13:09 – 00:01:16:21

Dawn

Thank you and welcome, Richard. Lovely to see you again.

 

00:01:16:23 – 00:01:18:20

Richard

Hello, don’t necessary. Hi, Linda.

 

00:01:19:00 – 00:01:43:23

Dawn

Really lovely to have both of you in the room today to be thinking about more about me. And just I wondered Richard if you could set the scene for people who are listening today to understand the difference between all about me, which we’ve talked about in previous podcasts, and the difference as to why some children are put

 

00:01:43:23 – 00:01:46:11

Dawn

into them. More about me part of this program.

 

00:01:46:21 – 00:02:04:08

Richard

Yes. So basically, what we have, as you all know from the previous podcasts around all about me and creative, all about me, that’s really capturing the now capturing the view with a child in their world. They exist in about what they and what their interests are, what they see as that kind of friendship groups where they live

 

00:02:05:02 – 00:02:19:18

Richard

. But for some young people, knowing the present doesn’t really help them to make sense of their past and so their past may often define them. And so in the Creative Life Story Work project, we have all about me, direct, all about me creative.

 

00:02:19:23 – 00:02:37:09

Richard

Then we have this more about me. We’re going to talk about today. And then for those very much more challenging situations and those children that may be suffering in a much, much more kind of a positive way. We have therapeutic life story work, but more about me is really where we’re working with young people to help them

 

00:02:37:09 – 00:02:54:10

Richard

understand how they got to, where they’ve got to and the reasons why they live, where they live. So it’s it’s very, very useful when we’re working with young people, for instance, who might not live with their family of origin or may live within a connected care situation or in a foster placement where they’re not really sure how

 

00:02:54:10 – 00:03:10:16

Richard

they got there. Or maybe things are happening in the world right now where they still have contact with their family of origin and curious about why they don’t live with them is very, very helpful sometimes to do a piece of work with a young person, which is targeted on a particular situation.

 

00:03:11:10 – 00:03:26:01

Richard

So we use more about me, books more about me, work for children, for instance, that may be involved in a placement with a connected carer or a special guardianship order placement where that child may have experienced their parents and domestic violence situation.

 

00:03:26:10 – 00:03:42:17

Richard

Maybe their parents have been involved in some form of drug use, which has got in the way of them being able to care for their children in a safe way. Maybe it’s young people who have been involved in witnessing particular traumas within the family of origin, which are still life for them, still drive them, still define some

 

00:03:42:17 – 00:03:55:17

Richard

of their behaviors. But they’re also trying to make sense of how can they now live somewhere? But they may also see these these people the other could figure out more about me. Work with children is we’re often working with their carers.

 

00:03:56:07 – 00:04:13:21

Richard

And so if you are a grandparent or an auntie or an uncle that caring for your child or if you’re a foster carer that’s working with your young person and you sometimes not really sure about that journey, not sure about what’s happened in that that kind of world, and you’re working with them around behaviors or emotions or

 

00:04:14:09 – 00:04:35:15

Richard

presentations that cause you concern or maybe give you reactions to your journey. Then more about me helps to parent figures and young people involved. And finally, of course, what the idea of more about me is is to allow young people to explore that path, to explore the the reasons why, but also for them to encourage you in

 

00:04:35:15 – 00:04:48:17

Richard

relationships with the now. So we use the concept of how I who I am, what comes from my past that I need to make sense of so that I can then move from and what’s in my past I want to honor and keep with me.

 

00:04:49:16 – 00:05:05:22

Richard

So it’s a lovely arrangement. It kind of works over eight to ten sessions. It starts off with getting to know the young person and the carer, and then it works in that sense of identifying those areas where the young person may be stuck.

 

00:05:06:05 – 00:05:21:01

Richard

So it might be, for instance, you have a young person who has some sexual harmful behaviors and therefore we can think around, well, where do those behaviors come from? What are those behaviors there for? And how are those behaviors maybe interrupting their opportunity for the future?

 

00:05:21:15 – 00:05:41:01

Richard

And so we deal with those things once we get to know the child. And then we think about how that child then has experienced made sense, moved forward and how in some cases we can change those behaviors. Or we can put a different view of those behaviors and the origin of those behaviors so that in the end

 

00:05:41:04 – 00:05:55:16

Richard

, hopefully the young people can see that there is a pathway they can follow that will help them to have a healthier, more concrete life with their carers, but also a life which actually has opportunity rather than being defined by those early life experiences.

 

00:05:55:20 – 00:06:20:00

Dawn

What I’m hearing really loudly and clearly is about the importance of the adults in the space, with the with the child and they’re their carer. Linda, I’m really delighted to be able to have you in the space today as a a recent graduates of Richard’s diploma course.

 

00:06:20:15 – 00:06:28:22

Dawn

And I wondered if you would be happy to talk about how you’re applying it to your to your work as a therapeutic life story worker?

 

00:06:29:01 – 00:06:46:12

Linda

All about me. Very different therapeutic astro work, as Richard explained. Therapeutic last story. Work is done over a much longer period and you go into far more more depth. If the therapeutic journey of the child, the more about me.

 

00:06:46:12 – 00:07:12:02

Linda

We focus on the here and now or what any issues are that are going on at that time that have affected the child, maybe, as Richard explained from the past. So we’ll look at who they are now and where they’ve come from and where we’re going in the future and how their behavior is affecting any issues within

 

00:07:12:02 – 00:07:40:08

Linda

the family at the current time. And. I use it very much so when I’m working with children who are placed with usually within the family unit, not with the parents, so particular with Astros, they could be living with grandparents and or with aunties and uncles, or it’s usually within that area.

 

00:07:40:12 – 00:08:00:00

Dawn

When you’re doing the work with the family. Because we’ll have people listening to this podcast who are foster carers or kinship carers. What what does it look like when this really good adult support in place to support that child through the process?

 

00:08:00:01 – 00:08:05:20

Dawn

What is it that the other adults around the child can be doing to support the process that you’re leading?

 

00:08:06:06 – 00:08:21:04

Linda

I always describe it as you actually see as the relationship starts to build. I mean, you always start a session, we start a session, do play and relaxation, and then we’ll go into whatever what we are actually doing at that time.

 

00:08:21:18 – 00:08:29:01

Linda

And you, I get it, as I say, you’ll see them swinging, if that makes sense.

 

00:08:29:02 – 00:08:32:01

Dawn

No. Tell me more about that. What does that look like?

 

00:08:32:18 – 00:08:58:06

Linda

You can get a child who is not in the here and now. Or maybe they’ve they’ve gone backed, but back to a trauma that’s happened previously and they can be very and their emotions are coming out. But then the carer will come in and then you’ll see them swinging together and working beautifully together.

 

00:08:59:23 – 00:09:22:01

Linda

And that relationship is enhanced. You see the carer support in the child and the child actually really wanting that support and going in there. And towards the end of that session, the child will. I call it I call it puddle jump.

 

00:09:22:06 – 00:09:40:01

Linda

A child can be in trauma very, very quickly and within. You can be discussed in a subject for 1515 minutes and then within ten minutes they’ve jumped completely out of that puddle. Children of a fantastic approach be able to do that.

 

00:09:41:06 – 00:09:58:12

Linda

I don’t think adults can. And that’s what I love about working on these projects and not projects working with these children and and seeing how we support them on the on the current traumas that they’re going through or behaviors.

 

00:09:58:13 – 00:10:18:14

Dawn

I love those examples of of those moments of them being together and that support us and then and the child being able to cope in a different way. But just describe in that really why imagine will be very useful for adults to understand as well that this is what’s happening in the space where they are with you

 

00:10:18:15 – 00:10:43:15

Linda

. Yeah. When the place with with grandparents, the grandparents know the journey, they know everything that’s happened and that can be very protective against maybe the child from even from if their maternal grandparents, if the parent has, you know, been involved in domestic abuse, drug abuse and they just take it as very matter of fact.

 

00:10:43:15 – 00:11:03:14

Linda

But they forget the child is in the middle of all this and they’re there. There are continuous heightened, you know, the listening all the time where grandparents and family members will off to talk about. And it can be derogatory, you know, not very nice what they talk about and the child is in the middle of this all

 

00:11:03:14 – 00:11:17:11

Linda

the time. So it’s supporting that and supporting the grant, the parent carer, very much so in that efforts as well, not just the child.

 

00:11:17:16 – 00:11:33:22

Richard

I think that’s right, isn’t it? Because what often happens when you’re doing, the more about me work is then to say you get the puddle jumping, you get that opportunity of light bulb moments or that resilience that you see from a child that can be the middle of something really, really difficult and then suddenly pop back out

 

00:11:33:22 – 00:11:49:14

Richard

of that situation. And as Linda says, it’s much more difficult for us as adults. A lot of our kind of experiences keep us right down, whereas a young person, if we get the right communication, can actually start to realize something and then suddenly go, Oh, oh yeah.

 

00:11:49:22 – 00:12:03:04

Richard

And then suddenly they’re in a different space. But I think carrying off what led to saying and I completely agree with her. What are the biggest issues are more about the work we find is the impact it has on those adults that involve in the work.

 

00:12:03:11 – 00:12:19:10

Richard

Because if you look at a grandparent as an example, we work with aunts, uncles, we also work with foster carers. We also work with their families. At the moment, for instance, I’m doing more about me, work with a couple of birth families where there’s been an issue around divorce and it’s been a bit difficult with the, you

 

00:12:19:10 – 00:12:34:09

Richard

know, the concepts of domestic violence. And as Linda said, the child’s been exposed to all these things and therefore the child may, you know, try to understand what’s happened to daddy, what’s happened to mummy. But what mummy and daddy have and what grandparents often have is is shame.

 

00:12:34:15 – 00:12:51:22

Richard

This blame, this guilt they carry on the kind of shut off wood off cut offs. And so what we often find doing more about me work with grandparents as an example is that they often are absolutely mindful of will this grandchild become like my daughter or like my son?

 

00:12:52:12 – 00:13:05:13

Richard

And so they’ll see little traits of behavior that we might believe is just normal, you know, kind of adolescence, normal kind of. I always have this comment when I work with children of seven year olds who am I are eleven year olds, who am I?

 

00:13:05:16 – 00:13:18:02

Richard

Who are you and our 13 year olds here? Mind, who the hell are you? And so whichever way you get to, there is a context where that child is trying to explore themselves and as they explore themselves and they get angry, they get cross.

 

00:13:18:02 – 00:13:32:13

Richard

They swear they do things that you know, we all do to learn. That is sometimes a bit of a kind of a red flag. If you like to a to a grandparent, if are that just like my daughter or oh my gosh, they’re just like my son, they’ve got to stop this.

 

00:13:33:03 – 00:13:46:12

Richard

Whereas what I think we do know more about me, hopefully, is that we actually work with grandparents and parents and, you know, kind of connect to carers to say, actually, there is this thing that we have in us, which is all around exploration.

 

00:13:46:21 – 00:14:01:19

Richard

But there’s also this thing around us, which is regret and sadness, and we’ll work with you’ll regret sadness. We’ll work with your own challenges around your own feelings about your own children so that we can then have space for you to connect with your grandchildren.

 

00:14:02:16 – 00:14:16:23

Richard

And so the best example I can give in, I think Linda will have loads as well is that I once worked with a young person and she was at school and really troubled at school. Those are difficulties, lots of sexually acting out behaviors and so, you know, neglect.

 

00:14:17:05 – 00:14:36:12

Richard

The school believes that. She was not eating food, so they referred to CAMHS because they felt that she was, you know, had a poor relationship with food at home. She was living with grandparents, grandparents, lots of guilt around their daughter and how their daughter had not managed to care for that child grandchild in an appropriate way.

 

00:14:36:21 – 00:14:56:23

Richard

And so they would absolutely kind of pour into her lots of love, attention, gifts and food. So as an example, in the morning she’d have a cooked breakfast with granddad. When she got back from school, she’d have pasta ready, and when she granddad got home, she got later fed with granddad and disco did want to say no

 

00:14:56:23 – 00:15:13:13

Richard

to her grandparents. The trouble was, of course, that that meant she’s got nothing left in her to take food on when she’s at school. She’s absolutely full up. And so she taught school. She doesn’t want food because school don’t talk to grandparents, and grandparents don’t talk to school because they don’t want to say what’s going on in

 

00:15:13:13 – 00:15:28:08

Richard

each other’s areas. What happens is that everything is then kind of, you know, out of sync. Everything is really problematic. Once we do more about me work, we can bring grandma to child school, to child, grant to school.

 

00:15:28:13 – 00:15:41:04

Richard

And suddenly we have a team around this child, which will actually see her as a whole person. And we do that not just for the child. We do that for the grandparents. We help the grandparents to see their own story, their own lives.

 

00:15:41:14 – 00:15:56:21

Richard

So it’s a really wonderful way of linking up the past to manage the present and then to look for the excitement of the future. Most of the people that we do know about me work with, you know, you see this kind of weaving of attachment, if you like.

 

00:15:57:04 – 00:16:15:14

Richard

That was always there, but interrupted. And I think that, you know, when Linda talks about, you know, kind of out of hesitancy, if you’re like us adults to puddle jump to be able to recover quickly. I think more about me work is as much for the carers, it’s for the young person.

 

00:16:16:00 – 00:16:35:06

Dawn

I’m definitely hearing about the the building of those relationships around the child, creating a really safe and brave place for them to be to have those conversations. The the phrase that’s coming into mind is only connect, bringing everybody together and forging those connections.

 

00:16:35:15 – 00:16:42:21

Dawn

I’m Linda. I wondered if you had a different example, though, to the one that Richard’s just described that you would like to share from your work.

 

00:16:43:01 – 00:17:13:07

Linda

I’ve just finished working with a little boy who was in the care of family members. However, he still did see I still had contact with his, with his mom, not with his dad, who’d never known his dad. However, mom would continue to just let him down and fail to turn up at times, and grandparents would get very

 

00:17:13:07 – 00:17:30:03

Linda

angry and. And call mom and say, you know, this is how she always is and and this is what she does all the time, and this is why you are a lot. You are to the child and and the child is then felt to feel, you know, this is my fault.

 

00:17:32:09 – 00:17:54:19

Linda

I’ve been taken away from my mom and. I think children, no matter what trauma they’ve been through, can often be quite often they still love the mom. You know that there remember all the good things that happened when they were living at home with mom and and they rarely remember or they park.

 

00:17:55:05 – 00:18:19:18

Linda

And as you know, they had in a little cupboard in and they had somewhere the bad things. So it’s then working with the grandparents and. To see, you know, what their behaviors and impact that is having on the child, which can speak to mom separately, and I think often, as Richard said, when you do get.

 

00:18:20:15 – 00:18:35:15

Linda

You speak to grandparents quite often. They go back to very difficult. They’ve had difficult upbringings as well. You can see that cycle that’s come through the family, and that can be very hard for grandparents to say as well.

 

00:18:36:19 – 00:19:01:01

Linda

However. This little boy I was working with, we worked really close network with the at the school and the grandparents, and we put that a team, you know, the team around the family together for the for the child and grandparents behaviors that really started to change and that impacted on the child straight.

 

00:19:02:03 – 00:19:25:16

Linda

You know, they started to think about what they were saying and. In front of the child and and that just improved. It hasn’t improved mom’s contact and engagement, but it’s improved that relationship with the child and the grandparents so that they can build on, carry on to build on that.

 

00:19:26:01 – 00:19:38:14

Linda

And they’re remembering, you know, continually reminding themselves of of of what the saying and where they’re saying it within within that home. I don’t know what Richard thinks about that.

 

00:19:38:22 – 00:19:52:01

Richard

I think that’s a good observation. And I think that, you know, when you do more about me, work in the primary factor, of course, is the young person we’re working with. But you can always do more about me, work with a parent, you could do more about me, work with a grandparent.

 

00:19:52:20 – 00:20:10:10

Richard

So it depends on who your kind of key individual you’re not aiming at. But I think for me, definitely. Like when Linda’s experiences, I’ve done many, many more about me and you know, we’re talking about drug misuse, for instance, and a young person I worked with doing more about me.

 

00:20:10:19 – 00:20:21:08

Richard

I remember him saying to me, I know how to do drugs, Richard and I shouldn’t. And then explained how men would take drugs. Now he was eight years old and then sort of saying things like, Oh, never take drugs.

 

00:20:21:19 – 00:20:34:04

Richard

And so in that sense of that, more about me work. We can actually start looking at those kind of, you know, singular issues. But we can also make sense of a broader context of, you know, human life and how we navigate.

 

00:20:34:16 – 00:20:48:14

Richard

I think that the other thing of interest in the more about me approach is it is short. So it is only, you know, eight to ten weeks. We do the first three weeks, really or three sessions is just finding out about the story of the people who working with.

 

00:20:48:14 – 00:21:06:11

Richard

So we refer to this as walking alongside the child’s world. So what they had done, first of all, was walk alongside this little boy’s world. And as she’s walking alongside the world, she’s seeing how the family work so where it doesn’t work, i.e. contact and where it’s sort of challenging the work in the carers space.

 

00:21:07:02 – 00:21:22:21

Richard

And then once we’ve done those three sessions, we then looking at, well, what does the child know? And so we we asked the child, we do things like timelines and family trees and things like this. And when we do these timelines or family trees, we’re actually looking for the narrative of the lead of the child.

 

00:21:22:21 – 00:21:41:00

Richard

We’re looking for the narrative of the adult. So again, I’m doing a piece of work currently where the child’s narrative and the grandparents narrative is very different. It’s not the same situation, but both have different concepts. So by doing both their timelines together, we can see what do they have in common?

 

00:21:41:10 – 00:21:58:02

Richard

We can see what does challenge. And then we can target that. So in the last four sessions, so that’s enough for three to get that story told. So in our last four sessions, that’s when we do our kind of our integrated work where we’re saying to both the young person and the the carer.

 

00:21:58:08 – 00:22:18:13

Richard

So what we see here together, what we understand together, how can behavior is the way it is? Is that about coping? It’s about defense. It’s about learned. It’s about desperation. But also what other behaviors could be maybe fashion that might get us the same security but become much more helpful to us.

 

00:22:19:09 – 00:22:36:06

Richard

And the other thing about more about me, Dawn, and I think again, that you may find this in your work is that when we do this work, the children’s larger world so that at the school of friendships, of being in the community start actually to increase positively.

 

00:22:36:19 – 00:22:55:12

Richard

And we believe and I fervently believe in this concept that what we’re actually doing, if you imagine that the child, you know, has all these stories, all these worries, all these hurt this loss, the separation and that preoccupies them, it builds up in their kind of awareness of self, which means that when they are operating in the

 

00:22:55:12 – 00:23:12:00

Richard

current world, there’s so little left to actually operate with because everything else is caught up in the past. If we can just for a moment, help the child on their carer to actually unload that, if you like to take that out of the child, place it into a recording process.

 

00:23:12:00 – 00:23:25:19

Richard

We use wallpaper just like in our therapeutic life story work and ask that child unloads all those thoughts and feelings and hurts and sadnesses, and the carer does the same with her or his thoughts. Feelings and softness is what we then have.

 

00:23:25:19 – 00:23:38:21

Richard

Is this opportunity for pre-occupation to lower and then the occupation, i.e. the chance to live their life to increase. And the biggest science we see, and I’m sure Linda sees this as well, is that children start to make friends.

 

00:23:39:10 – 00:23:53:17

Richard

They start to enjoy school. They start to tell their carers that they might love them. They start to, you know, be more mindful about their their space. We see children slow down, but we also see children start to make sense of their world.

 

00:23:54:00 – 00:24:03:14

Richard

And this is the wonderful thing about more about me because you don’t need a lot of time to do this work if you’ve got the engagement of the carers as well.

 

00:24:04:05 – 00:24:22:08

Dawn

I love the the phrase that you used about walking along. Side the child and you can almost see different possibilities being created out of the work that you’re out of, the work that you’re doing, and you’ve said a couple of times Richard unblinded that it’s a short process eight to twelve weeks.

 

00:24:23:17 – 00:24:43:15

Dawn

How what happens when you hit that last session? Just I know that we’re in the all about me. We’re going to, you know, when that last session happens. What are the what happens to to make the ending a good ending or a transition into another part of the creative life story work process?

 

00:24:43:22 – 00:24:59:09

Richard

The last session that we do are more about me is normally a very kind of setup retreat session. We produce a book, so the children are the on the carer, have a book that they share, and the book is a kind of record of what we’ve talked about, a record of what we’ve resolved.

 

00:24:59:19 – 00:25:10:14

Richard

Record is things that are still outstanding. Maybe. And then what we do is we often would have it a little bit of a kind of celebration. It might be a cake or a drink or something like that, but we plan it.

 

00:25:10:14 – 00:25:29:17

Richard

We plan it together. But what we also do is we as workers professionals, we assess, well, what else might be helpful. So we would always say all about me books or all about me, creative life story, work or all about me direct, depending on which pathway should also happen every six months after we finished.

 

00:25:30:02 – 00:25:40:06

Richard

And what that does is that’s like a caretaker to the placement. So it just says this is the last six months. So this is what I’ve done, but this is what I’ve achieved. And these are things that have gone wrong and these things have gone right.

 

00:25:40:22 – 00:25:58:09

Richard

But they do that together. They kind of have that journey together. So the caribou do their own all about me. Book alongside the child. So that’s one thing for some children. We might recommend a non-direct to therapy. It might be that, you know, there are areas where we feel the child might, you know, kind of prosper.

 

00:25:58:16 – 00:26:11:04

Richard

And that might be something like art therapy or dance therapy or play therapy, or it might be equine therapy or some some of that something similar. And I would say probably about two in every ten I do would go down that road.

 

00:26:11:18 – 00:26:27:17

Richard

For some children, though, sadly there is more that we need to do. And so we might actually then go into that therapeutic life story work side, which is a lot bigger a piece of work. It’s a twelve month piece of work, really, so that’s 18 sessions of direct work.

 

00:26:28:02 – 00:26:47:06

Richard

And in that therapeutic life story side, that might be because some of the behaviors that we’ve addressed still need some support. And so that could be the outcomes. But we always end celebratory, always with that achievement and always with an acknowledgment of the work that’s being covered and the work that we’ve done together.

 

00:26:47:07 – 00:27:10:11

Linda

We always talk about endings, you know, two or three weeks before we get there as well. So they they know that ending is coming. And and as Richard said, looking at the family, working together, carrying on that, that work you’ve done certainly for at least six months or some passing on as rich is set to something else

 

00:27:11:08 – 00:27:29:01

Linda

, you know, especially if you’re in that team around a child with with school as well. So they may recommend, you know, some more summer therapy at school or something that’s going on within school or something much more therapeutic therapeutic led.

 

00:27:29:08 – 00:27:46:13

Linda

But it’s definitely a celebration on the final one and building up to that. And I think using the wallpaper is such a fantastic tool as the child gets the book at the end, but they get to keep the wallpaper and.

 

00:27:48:02 – 00:28:08:01

Linda

I’m sure Richard does the same as me, but I especially going through every session and eight to ten weeks, it’s that easy just to keep rolling out and keep going over and reiterating. And given that the child and the carer time to process what you’ve done over the weeks, even if it’s just a quick snap, little look

 

00:28:08:01 – 00:28:23:09

Linda

at it every week and then building up to that final session. But the final session is definitely a celebration of the little boy. I’ve just finished him. He gave me a beautiful card and it wrote in his only nine and it wrote in it.

 

00:28:23:23 – 00:28:28:10

Linda

Thank you for helping me grow. And I just think that’s just so special.

 

00:28:28:21 – 00:28:29:23

Richard

Quite amazing, these children.

 

00:28:30:05 – 00:28:49:15

Dawn

And on that very special story, I think we have to draw our conversation to a close. I’d like to chat on all morning. Thank you, Linda, and thank you, Richard, for giving us such a clear insight into more about me.

 

00:28:50:15 – 00:29:14:20

Dawn

What happens in your sessions and and insight into what might be next? Thank you for your time and generosity this morning. Whether you’re a foster carer, someone who has experience of the care system or you work with children and young people, we hope this episode has given you an insight into how we could make life story work

 

00:29:14:20 – 00:29:30:01

Dawn

better for young people. You can find out more about our show at We Are Blue Captain Dot Com Forward Slash podcast, and we’d love to hear your thoughts. You can record and send a direct question or message to the show via the website.

 

00:29:30:11 – 00:29:45:10

Dawn

Tweet us at at we are blue carbon or if you are one of the 15 hundred people taking part in our Creative Life Story Work Learning program, you can always get in touch through the online learning platform if you’d like to listen to future episodes.

 

00:29:45:16 – 00:29:57:20

Dawn

Remember to subscribe wherever it is you usually get your podcasts, and if you’re using Apple Podcasts, please do leave us a review as it really helps others to find our show. Bye for now.

 

00:30:01:07 – 00:30:06:13

Speaker 4

The Creative Life Story Work podcast is an annual media production for Blue Cabin.

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